Fake News- Reblog from Sgt. Mom

Here was a huge story, broadcast practically on the eve of the election, a story based on documents of a deeply uncertain provenance, relayed to a Bush-hating reporter by a man with a grudge against Bush. It came over as a breathtakingly audacious attempt to throw an election based on forged memos. Worse; I began to wonder how many other stories that 60 Minutes had broadcast over the years were built on just as shaky a foundation … which had gone unremarked, as interested amateurs with specific knowledge had never gotten a chance to examine the evidence for themselves. The list of other fake news perpetuated by the mainstream media is frankly overwhelming to contemplate; fabulists, fakes, and selective omission. I’ll skip making a comprehensive list of them, as it would make this post the length of one of my books, and those of us of a libertarian/conservative leaning have our own lists readily in mind.

I’m not sure exactly why, but I found this rather strikingly well phrased.

She’s also got a very good point about the same story popping up in a bunch of different places.

h/t MobiusWolf

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3 thoughts on “Fake News- Reblog from Sgt. Mom”

  1. I thought of a flip side of the Gell-Mann*– it was full of lies or inaccuracies, yes; but was it totally false, or just had a notable number of things that weren’t so? It only takes about…what… one in twenty claims that are not in agreement with what I know to classify something as full of lies? One in fifty? One in a hundred? If it’s the last one, then the common claim about Rush being a total liar is supported– and I think it may be an even lower percent for a data heavy subject, if the statements are totally false. I know that I don’t trust the Isaac Absimov’s Book of Facts because several of the facts turned out to be false. I don’t even know if they were known false at the time!

    ‘s why I like good blogs. They’ll give you the sources for their claims.

    *sub assumption? Consideration before jumping to the “people are dumb” conclusion so popular?

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